Monthly Archives: October 2005

No Title Today

I have not been in the mood to blog lately. I am not entirely sure why, but it may have something to do with just being burnt out. In spite of how I feel I must get these links up. That said, I have been scanning news feeds for articles about Linux authentication mechanisms. Linux (via PAM) has the uncanny ability to authenticate to everything from a Windows AD network to SSL shared keys. I am fairly sure it would even be possible to get PAM to use the current state of my toaster oven to validate a user. Of greatest interest to me is, getting Linux to use use LDAP for network authentication. As such we have todays links.

Hopefully I will be back to my full blogging glory after this weekend. Lots has been happening in the world, in my life, and in my home; but until I get out of this slump my body just keeps saying “NO blogging today!”

I Do What?

So you have recently been described (or maybe reclassified) as a Software Architect. So exactly what does that mean? This question is asked often enough by re-christened software engineers that you can actually find wikipedia entries on it. Well, thankfully, informait.com Do?” href=”http://www.informit.com/articles/article.asp?p=417090&rl=1″>has the answer. Besides of fun of design (obviously boring part of the job) you also get to write a whole new class of reports… and meetings!

Super Suse

Yesterday, Open Suse released Suse Linux 10. The upgrade has been painless for me and adds a significant number of improvements over 9.3. With community support for Open Suse, things are even getting better. The default Suse 10 install is Free Software only; but this overview will get you everything you need to complete your Suse install (i.e. commercial applications line Adobe Acrobat, Real Player, Java, Windows Media Codexes, and Flash.) So far its been a really nice ride.

AJAX Development

With the success of maps.google.com intrest has begun to grow in Ajax programming. Functionally AJAX programming JavaScript, DHTML, and XML to “communicate” between a web browser and a server without the need to refresh the screen (actually AJAX is about a great deal more than that, but this is the part that everyone seems interested in.)

To get a good intoduction into AJAX I have found a couple simple tutorials. Using AJAX is a basic tutorial (with examples) for getting web developers familiar with using and developing AJAX. Guide to Using XMLHttpRequest is a baby steps approach to setting up the communications interface between JavaScript and your application server. Finally, be sure to check out Dojo Toolkit, probably the most mature AJAX based API currently available. It dramatically simplifies the process of developing AJAX applications.